Friday, July 18, 2014

Conflicting Advice For Men Regarding Prostate Cancer

Men can and should be confused about the advice and warning they receive about prostate cancer. On the one hand there is  The United States Preventive Services Task Force who recommends that regardless of age, men without symptoms should not routinely have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test to screen for prostate cancer. The logic behind this decision comes from the fact that too many men are choosing to aggressively treat their prostate cancer when aggressive treatment isn't necessary.

In other words men are basing their choice of treatment on their fear of cancer rather than the specifics of their diagnosis.  That's definitely a problem that needs to be addressed. That said, keeping men ignorant about the possibility of prostate cancer is equally dangerous.

Here's another fact men need to know before they blindly follow the recommendations of the U.S Preventive Services Task Force:
 The number of younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased nearly 6-fold in the last 20 years, and the disease is more likely to be aggressive in these younger men, according to a new analysis. Typically, prostate cancer occurs more frequently as men age into their 70s or 80s. However, the researchers found that when prostate cancer strikes at a younger age, it's likely because the tumor is growing quickly.

To read the article where this quote is taken from click on this link:
Incidence of Aggressive Prostate Cancer Increasing In Young Men

I don't know about you, but when it comes to making life and death decisions I prefer to error on the side of caution. That's why I believe it's important for men, especially those men who have a family history of prostate cancer to begin screening as early as in their twenties and thirties.

The incidence of aggressive  prostate cancer found in young men is on the rise. Men need to based their decision making based on reality rather than the  ridiculous  recommendations from the Task Force. That's my take away from this, what's yours?